Too timid to sell

India-camel ride (al rho)-a

This is David, riding a camel in India, 2012.

As I said in my prior post, David and I enjoy conversing about our childhood.   This time, we discussed selling things to make money.

David’s high school band wanted to perform in Montreal and London during the summer.  So, each band member was given boxes of cookies to sell to pay for the trip.  David said that though he was already 18 years old, he was too timid to sell those cookies.  He wanted his mother to go with him door to door.  However, David’s father decided to take the cookies to the business college, which he headed, and his students immediately purchased all of the cookies.  David went on his trip that summer and had a ball playing his clarinet in Montreal, visiting New York, performing in London, and then seeing Denmark on the way back home.

It’s hard to believe David was too timid to sell the cookies on his own, because later in life, he was able to successfully teach accounting at Kapiolani Community College.  Imagine him standing in front of a group of college students without quaking in his shoes.  Not timid, at all.

As a child, I had the brilliant idea of picking cilantro from my father’s garden, securing it with a rubber band, and selling bunches to my neighbors for 5 cents per bunch.  What an easy way to earn money!  And I wasn’t shy, either.

My daughter, Lisa, also was quite the business person.  When she was little, she decided to groom pets for $5 each.  She placed handmade notices in mail boxes all over our neighborhood.  But, the only phone call she got was from an irate neighbor, who warned her that it was a federal offense to open people’s mail boxes.  So, that project failed.

Ah, well, nothing ventured, nothing gained.  We all had fun, nevertheless.

10 Responses to “Too timid to sell”

  1. Beatrice P. Boyd Says:

    These conversatione between you and David seem like a great idea because they involve sharing and remembering. Pat and I have shared similar moments and I am enjoying reading these posts.

  2. DJan Says:

    I don’t think I’ve ever sold anything door to door. It’s possible I’ve forgotten, since it’s been so long ago. I’m also enjoying these peeks into the past. 🙂

  3. SchmidleysScribbling Says:

    I sold Girl Scout cookies door to door. Met all sorts of people. Perhaps the point is to learn how to meet people, more so than a few bucks earned?

  4. DeniseinVA Says:

    We had a lot of pet rabbits which made more pet rabbits. We sold them to a local pet store for pocket money. The only problem was I loved my rabbits so much I could hardly give them up and ended keeping most of them. Fortunately, my Dad being a great animal lover, was a good carpenter hobbyist and made loads of very roomy rabbit hutches, that probably looked like a palace to a rabbit. Love the photo of David on the camel.

  5. Christine Says:

    oh poor Lisa. You are a natural business person! And good for David, he is a teacher not a saleperson!

  6. Suzanne Says:

    I was still very timid at 18 too. I then started waitressing in my 20’s and it was knocked out of me quickly.

  7. Joanne Says:

    A childhood of good memories is the best to ask for.

  8. Grannymar Says:

    We were never allowed to sell anything door to door.

  9. Olga Says:

    I once heard that teachers make good sales people because teaching is about sales. I don’t think that is universally true. Sometimes teaching is like acting–taking on a different personality quite alien to your own shy self.

  10. Bella Rose Says:

    I wonder if camels are easier than horses to ride….I fell off of a horse the last time I tried.

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