Solar water heater

In 1997, we took advantage of a tax credit by purchasing a solar water heater.  This cut our electric bill by a considerable amount, depending on the number of people living with us.  In 2012, we replaced the entire system after we installed a new roof on our house.  Every five years, we have the solar water heater serviced.

This is how the laundry room and the heater in the patio look when the doors are closed:

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The 80 gallon water heater is on the right side.  The hose on the bottom is flushing and draining the heater, and the water flows into the grass:

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This magnesium rod prevented the heater from rusting:

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This is Douglas White, the owner of Affordable Solar, who installed our solar water heater in 1997 and 2012:

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This is his assistant, who cleaned the solar panels with water and a towel and is shown painting the rubber lining with black paint:

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This is Douglas White, removing the hose from the water heater:

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David and Douglas chat:

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We are very pleased with Douglas White and his company, Affordable Solar.  Good job!

14 Responses to “Solar water heater”

  1. honoluluaunty91 Says:

    Good to know! We have a gas water heater and have installed solar voltaic panels to cover all our electrical needs. Smartest decision we made. Love solar, especially in Hawaii with our high electricity costs. I always wondered how Las Vegas and California have such low electrical rates, and here in Hawaii, our rates are in the hundreds of dollars for a single family home.

  2. DeniseinVA Says:

    Very interesting Gigi and thank you for letting me know about Dianne.

  3. dkzody Says:

    Much of California’s electricity is water-powered. So that helps with costs. But our costs are getting higher. We still have such a low electricity bill (less than $150/month) that it would not pay us to install solar on our roof. However many of our friends who live in large houses and have pools have installed solar and saved large amounts of $$. Our water heater is gas powered, as is our heating system.

  4. Tom Sightings Says:

    Good for you! Are solar panels for your entire electrical needs next?

  5. Olga Says:

    I wish that I had solar power. I see very few panels here in Florida and I have yet to see a solar farm like those that are common in VT. Can’t quite figure that out because Florida is far sunnier than Vermont.

  6. Christine Says:

    Good for you embracing new technology! We’ve had calls from people but didn’t know much about it and decided to put that off.

  7. Carole Says:

    Very interesting! Thanks for sharing. Solar power is definitely the wave of the future.

  8. Linda Reeder Says:

    Interesting. Solar power is rare here in the cloudy coastal pacific Northwest.
    We would also not have our laundry outside.Is that common in Hawaii?

    • gigihawaii Says:

      The older generation and immigrants tend to hang laundry outdoors. I use my electric dryer, though. As for laundry rooms, they can be either inside or outside the house in Hawaii.

  9. Kay G. Says:

    We need to use solar power in Georgia more.
    Remember Jimmy Carter? Read about him and his solar panels in Plains, Georgia. It’s interesting.

  10. Kay G. Says:

    Oh me, sorry, didn’t know it would put all that into the comment!

  11. anonymousonthemainland!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Says:

    I use wooden dryer racks in my garage to dry things all the time..It is cloudy and windy and more rain today and this week..We have lived in our home come September 39 years coldest rainiest dec. jan and February ever! I still hang clothes because drying really doesn’t do well on intimates and clothes you want to keep for a long time..Still have Columbia jackets that are well over 21 years and to tell the truth are made better than the two I got at value village brand new in seattle 5 years ago for $5.00 a piece but they are so little compared to what a Columbia jackets costs here we just love them and use them gingerly. I hang my clothes when it is hot outside and they dry in 20 to 30 minutes I hang them early and take them right down then I am free to go & do what I want..Kudos for solar!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. DJan Says:

    Here in the Pacific Northwest, we mostly use washers and dryers because it’s, well, damp here. Like Linda said, we don’t see many solar homes here. 🙂

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